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Top 10 Ways to Teach Kindness to Kids

Sep 13, 2022 06:32AM ● By Stephanie Sabin

SPONSORED BY

DupeePlumbing

The concept of kindness can be difficult to explain, however, teaching it can be easier than you think. Children will mirror what they see so, use these tips to help teach them that kindness matters.

  1. Illustrate and model “paying it forward." Show your children how doing a good deed can often circle back to them.
  2. Teach them that small acts matter. Opening a door for someone, thanking the waitress or offering to help a friend can demonstrate kindness in small yet meaningful ways.
  3. Use your manners. Politeness is always welcome and expresses kindness Teach kids that “please” and “thank you” are signs of respect that never go out of style.
  4. Talk to your kids about bullying. Stopbullying.gov is a great resource aimed at explaining how bullying can have a negative effect.
  5. Empower your kids to trust themselves to understand the difference between right and wrong. Good instincts can create positive outcomes.
  6. Volunteer! Kids can learn kindness by volunteering. It is a great way to spend time together as a family while teaching them the value of lending a helping hand to those in need.
  7. Explain the impact of a compliment. Everyone loves to get one so play the compliment game with your kids by sharing the things you love about one another. Actively sharing these compliments can allow kids to understand how great it feels to give and receive them.
  8. Read books and tell stories about kindness and compassion for others to your children. A quick google search shows many are available for all ages.
  9. Help them understand that kindness requires work sometimes. Remind them that there can be times when they may not feel like sharing or smiling and that is OK. Turning a frown upside down can allow you to feel better and shows compassion for those around.
  10. Finally, lead by example and encourage kindness. Show kindness and gratitude to your kids. Thank them for sharing their toys. Smile when they offer to help fold the clothes, even if they are not achieving perfection.
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